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  • Tom Fowler

Legal Business Advice Every Company Should Be Aware Of

Running a business is no easy task, but it can get even more complicated when you don't know the laws and regulations that govern your industry. This article will provide you with some essential legal advice for any business, so that you can ensure your company operates within the law. Read on to learn more about how to protect your business and its assets.


Types of Business Structures

Types of Business Structures


There are four main types of business structures in the United States: sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies (LLCs). Each type of business has its own advantages and disadvantages.


Sole Proprietorship: A sole proprietorship is a business owned by one person. The owner has complete control over the business and all of its profits and losses. The biggest advantage of a sole proprietorship is that it is the simplest and easiest type of business to start and maintain. However, the biggest disadvantage is that the owner is personally liable for all debts and liabilities of the business.


Partnership: A partnership is a business owned by two or more people. Partners share control over the business and its profits and losses. The biggest advantage of a partnership is that it can raise more capital than a sole proprietorship because there are more owners. The biggest disadvantage is that partners are personally liable for all debts and liabilities of the business.


Corporation: A corporation is a separate legal entity from its owners. The corporation itself can own property, enter into contracts, and sue or be sued. The biggest advantage of a corporation is that the owners have limited liability for debts and liabilities incurred by the corporation. The biggest disadvantage of a corporation is that it can be more expensive to set up and maintain than other types of businesses.


Limited Liability Company (LLC): An LLC is a hybrid between a partnership and a corporation. Like a corporation, the owners of an LLC have limited liability for debts and liabilities incurred by the business. However, like a partnership, profits and losses are divided according to the owners' ownership interests. The biggest advantage of an LLC is that it offers flexibility in terms of how profits and losses are divided among its owners. The biggest disadvantage is that it can be more expensive to set up and maintain than other types of businesses.


PPM


When it comes to seeking outside investment for your company, you will likely come across the term “private placement memorandum” (PPM). A PPM is a formal document that is provided to potential investors to solicit their investment. The PPM contains important information about the company, such as its financials, business model, and growth prospects.


As the name suggests, a PPM is not publicly available. In order to obtain a copy of a PPM, you must be an accredited investor, which generally means having a net worth of $1 million or an annual income of $200,000. You can visit this website if you wish to learn more, or you can do your own research online. Keep in mind that a PPM is a complex document, and you should always seek legal advice before making any investment decisions.


Business and Tax Planning


As a business owner, it is important to be aware of the legal implications that come with running a company. From tax planning to employee contracts, there are a number of issues that need to be taken into account in order to avoid any legal problems down the line.


One of the most important aspects of business ownership is tax planning. It is crucial to ensure that you are up-to-date with the latest tax laws and regulations, as failure to do so could result in hefty fines. There are a number of ways to stay on top of your taxes, including using accounting software or hiring a professional accountant.


Protecting Your Business’ Assets


1. Contracts: Make sure that any contracts you enter into are in writing and clearly state the rights and obligations of each party. This will help to avoid disputes down the road.


2. Intellectual property: If you have developed any intellectual property, such as a trademark or copyrighted material, make sure to register it with the appropriate authorities. This will give you legal protection against infringement.


3. Liability: Be aware of potential liability issues that could arise from your business activities. For example, if you sell products, you could be liable for injuries caused by those products. You may want to purchase insurance to protect yourself from these types of risks.


Protecting Your Business' Assets

It is essential to stay informed on all laws and regulations governing businesses, as they can help protect you from potential risks or liabilities down the line. With this knowledge, companies can ensure their success and longevity by taking proactive steps to remain compliant with applicable laws.


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